Lynton Scholars

Thanks to the generosity of the family of Jamie and Michael Lynton, the Andrew Levitt Center for Social Emergency Medicine is pleased to announce a new scholarship supporting three medical students and three residents to attend a groundbreaking invitational consensus conference, “Inventing Social Emergency Medicine,” on September 14-15, 2017, at ACEP’s headquarters in Dallas, Texas. The purpose of this conference is to establish the intellectual underpinnings of the nascent field of Social Emergency Medicine. The Levitt Center for Social Emergency Medicine, in collaboration with the Emergency Medicine Foundation and the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), has received funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to conduct the conference. Lynton Scholars receive airfare and accommodations and will have the opportunity to not only attend but also be actively involved in the publications and supplements arising from the conference. We received an unanticipated - and extraordinary - number of applications for the six scholarships. The commitment among all the applicants to SEM was remarkable, and the excellent qualifications and recommendations from all candidates spoke to serious and genuine dedication to this emerging field.

Petrina Craine, MD Petrina Craine hails from Memphis, TN. She is a graduate of Duke University. While pursuing her undergraduate studies there in Biology and Global Health, she was responsible for health outreach programs designed to advocate for better urban health for the residents of Durham, NC. Upon returning to Memphis to obtain her medical degree at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, she served various underserved communities both internationally and domestically through projects designed to reduce health disparities. She has been the recipient of numerous scholarships and honors for academic and extracurricular achievements as well as a leader of multiple organizations. Petrina is currently a resident in Emergency Medicine at Alameda County Medical Center (Highland Hospital) in Oakland, CA where she continues to devote her work to social emergency medicine, including topics in gun violence, human trafficking, and diversity and inclusion.

Petrina Craine, MD

Petrina Craine hails from Memphis, TN. She is a graduate of Duke University. While pursuing her undergraduate studies there in Biology and Global Health, she was responsible for health outreach programs designed to advocate for better urban health for the residents of Durham, NC. Upon returning to Memphis to obtain her medical degree at the University of Tennessee Health Science Center, she served various underserved communities both internationally and domestically through projects designed to reduce health disparities. She has been the recipient of numerous scholarships and honors for academic and extracurricular achievements as well as a leader of multiple organizations. Petrina is currently a resident in Emergency Medicine at Alameda County Medical Center (Highland Hospital) in Oakland, CA where she continues to devote her work to social emergency medicine, including topics in gun violence, human trafficking, and diversity and inclusion.

Austin Kilaru, MD Austin Kilaru is chief resident at Highland Emergency Medicine. He previously worked as a fellow at the Penn Center for Emergency Care Policy and Research, conducting research into opioid guidelines, social media, and regionalization of care. He is interested in the incorporation of social emergency medicine services into healthcare delivery, infrastructure, and reimbursement.

Austin Kilaru, MD

Austin Kilaru is chief resident at Highland Emergency Medicine. He previously worked as a fellow at the Penn Center for Emergency Care Policy and Research, conducting research into opioid guidelines, social media, and regionalization of care. He is interested in the incorporation of social emergency medicine services into healthcare delivery, infrastructure, and reimbursement.

Rebecca Karb, MD, PhD Rebecca Karb is currently a 4th year resident in Emergency Medicine at Brown University. She graduated from Harvard Medical School in 2014. In her life-before-medicine, she lived in Tucson, where she served as an AmeriCorps volunteer and then in Ann Arbor, where she earned a PhD in Sociology and Social Work at the University of Michigan. Her research has focused on the effects of neighborhood poverty and violence on health, and she hopes to integrate this work into her future EM career. She spends pretty much all of her free time outside work with her family and three daughters. 

Rebecca Karb, MD, PhD

Rebecca Karb is currently a 4th year resident in Emergency Medicine at Brown University. She graduated from Harvard Medical School in 2014. In her life-before-medicine, she lived in Tucson, where she served as an AmeriCorps volunteer and then in Ann Arbor, where she earned a PhD in Sociology and Social Work at the University of Michigan. Her research has focused on the effects of neighborhood poverty and violence on health, and she hopes to integrate this work into her future EM career. She spends pretty much all of her free time outside work with her family and three daughters. 

 
Tehreem Rehman Tehreem Rehman was born in Queens, NY, and raised by a woman of great strength and dedication to helping others. Growing up in a household below the federal poverty level, she became intimately familiar with inequities very early on. She found herself increasingly drawn to health justice issues as she learned how the lack of health cripples one’s ability to truly thrive and live with dignity. Currently, she is a medical student at Yale School of Medicine where she co-founded a course on U.S. Health Justice that seeks to train medical, nursing, and physician associate students at Yale on structural determinants of health inequity and advocacy. Presently, she also serves as co-founder of Systemic Disease, a project that seeks to address bias in medicine through storytelling and curricular reform.

Tehreem Rehman

Tehreem Rehman was born in Queens, NY, and raised by a woman of great strength and dedication to helping others. Growing up in a household below the federal poverty level, she became intimately familiar with inequities very early on. She found herself increasingly drawn to health justice issues as she learned how the lack of health cripples one’s ability to truly thrive and live with dignity. Currently, she is a medical student at Yale School of Medicine where she co-founded a course on U.S. Health Justice that seeks to train medical, nursing, and physician associate students at Yale on structural determinants of health inequity and advocacy. Presently, she also serves as co-founder of Systemic Disease, a project that seeks to address bias in medicine through storytelling and curricular reform.

Theresa Cheng, MD, JD Theresa Cheng, M.D., J.D., is a native of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in Cognitive Neuroscience. She pursued her MD/JD at Mayo Clinic Medical School and University of California, Berkeley School of Law, specializing in international humanitarian law to shape the practice of medicine to promote human dignity and social justice. Theresa is currently a first year Emergency Medicine resident at UCLA-Olive View. She ultimately hopes to meld clinical practice with legal knowledge and advocacy within Social Emergency Medicine in order to become better equipped to address the need for more equitable and accessible healthcare systems in this country and others.

Theresa Cheng, MD, JD

Theresa Cheng, M.D., J.D., is a native of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and graduated magna cum laude from Harvard University in Cognitive Neuroscience. She pursued her MD/JD at Mayo Clinic Medical School and University of California, Berkeley School of Law, specializing in international humanitarian law to shape the practice of medicine to promote human dignity and social justice. Theresa is currently a first year Emergency Medicine resident at UCLA-Olive View. She ultimately hopes to meld clinical practice with legal knowledge and advocacy within Social Emergency Medicine in order to become better equipped to address the need for more equitable and accessible healthcare systems in this country and others.

Catherine Wolff, MS Catherine Wolff, MS is a MD/PhD student in the dissertation year of her injury epidemiology PhD at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She attends medical school at Duke University and will pursue an emergency medicine residency upon graduation. Catherine received her undergraduate degree in public health from the University of Pennsylvania (Penn). She spent several years managing health policy research projects, first with a VA team evaluating end-of-life inpatient care, and then with a Penn research team focusing on trauma system organization and access to emergency care. During this time, Catherine completed a graduate degree in health policy research at Penn, focusing on emergency medicine and trauma care. Catherine also has many years of experience as an emergency medical technician, working with the University of Pennsylvania emergency response team and in a leadership capacity with a firehouse in the Philadelphia suburbs. Catherine’s research interests include firearm violence, disparities in trauma and emergency medicine, and systems of emergency care. In her free time she volunteers with her county’s domestic violence and sexual assault agency.

Catherine Wolff, MS

Catherine Wolff, MS is a MD/PhD student in the dissertation year of her injury epidemiology PhD at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She attends medical school at Duke University and will pursue an emergency medicine residency upon graduation. Catherine received her undergraduate degree in public health from the University of Pennsylvania (Penn). She spent several years managing health policy research projects, first with a VA team evaluating end-of-life inpatient care, and then with a Penn research team focusing on trauma system organization and access to emergency care. During this time, Catherine completed a graduate degree in health policy research at Penn, focusing on emergency medicine and trauma care. Catherine also has many years of experience as an emergency medical technician, working with the University of Pennsylvania emergency response team and in a leadership capacity with a firehouse in the Philadelphia suburbs. Catherine’s research interests include firearm violence, disparities in trauma and emergency medicine, and systems of emergency care. In her free time she volunteers with her county’s domestic violence and sexual assault agency.