UNDERSTANDING THE TOXIC CYCLE: EXPANDING EMERGENCY CARE OF ALCOHOL & OTHER DRUGS

The emergency department (ED) is frequently the only source of care for patients with substance abuse and dependency problems.  We are using the social emergency medicine framework to understand how the ED can improve the care of these patients, particularly in the realms of referral to treatment, brief interventions, and refining clinical strategies for patients in acute withdrawal. We also hope soon to study the effect that these drugs have on other common ED problems, especially violence.


MEDICATION ASSISTED TREATMENT IN tHE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT: A Pilot Investigation

Site PI: Andrew Herring, MD

Funder: California HealthCare Foundation

The objective of this project is to increase access to medically assisted treatment of opioid addiction through initiating treatment in the emergency department. The project will pilot a treatment model, proven successful in a controlled academic environment, in an urban region, and share the results in CHCF and peer-reviewed publications.


ENVIRONMENTAL DRINKING CONTEXTS & INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE

Site PI: Harrison Alter, MD, MS

Funder: NIH 1R01AA022990

The relationship between alcohol use and intimate partner violence is well-established but little understood. To help move the field forward, the Levitt Center has partnered as a subawardee with the Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation to perform a mixed-methods study of drinking contexts -- where, when and with whom -- and how such contexts influence partner abuse patterns. This is a five year project, and will involve in-depth interviews of dozens of patients and surveys of hundreds.


THE PHARMACO-ECOLOGY OF GUN VIOLENCE: A Pilot Investigation

Site PI: Harrison Alter, MD, MS

Funder: The Pacific Institute for Research and Evaluation (PIRE)

It is a truism that guns and drugs don't mix, but in certain social settings they appear to be inextricable. This small exploratory study, in collaboration with toxicologists and emergency physicians at the University of California, Fresno and anthropologists at aims to understand the interplay between the substances that gun-injured patients believe they use and why, as well as what is actually in their bloodstream at the time of their injury.